indonesia travel magazine

Kerinci Seblat National Park, West Sumatra

 Kerinci-Seblat-Karbau-01-800

Mount-Kerinci-01

Kerinci Seblat National Park comprises an area of 1.5 million ha in four provinces: West Sumatra, Jambi, Bengkulu and South Sumatra. A large part of the biggest national park of Sumatra lies above 400 m and is relatively cool. The park probably contains the largest contiguous population of the Sumatran Rhino, estimated at between 250 and 500 individuals.
Due to the fact that a large part of Bukit Barisan Mountain range, including it’s highest peak the Gunung Kerinci (3,805m), lies in the park, Kerinci Seblat consists of very mountainous terrain. In the mountains you will find hot springs and many rivers with rapids and scenic waterfalls. Especially around the crater-lakes of Gunung Tujuh (2604m) and Gunung Kerinci, the landscape is very beautiful.
East of Gunung Kerinci lies lake Bento, the highest freshwater swamp in Sumatra. Ladeh Panjang is probably the highest peat swamp woodland (altitude 2,000 m).
The relatively flat Kerinci valley cuts the park in two and forms the main entrance to the area. The valley is situated at an altitude of 800 m and has a population of about 300,000 people.
Access
As stated above the main entrance to the park is the Kerinci valley. In Sungai Penuh, halfway between Padang and Bengkulu, you can find several losmen. Buses to Sungai Penuh leave from Bukittinggi, Padang (10-12 hours) or Jambi (20-24 hours). Permits are available at the PHPA offices in Jambi, Padang or Sungai Penuh. Inside the park a guide is obligatory.
Accomodation
* Sungai Penuh
o Hotel Busana, Jl. Martadinata
o Hotel Matahari, Jl.Jend.A.Yani 25
* Kersik Tuo
Several Homestays
* Pelompek
PHPA Homestays
Trekking
* Kayu Aro (1500m)-Gunung Kerinci 2 days
* Pelompek-Danau Gunung Tujuh 1 day
* hot springs at Semurup
* Letter W waterfall
* Along the several rivers: Air Rupit, Air Seblat, Air Tebat Pelapo.

Kerinci-Seblat-Transport-01-800
Flora

More than 4,000 plant species, including 300 species of orchids and the rare Javan Edelweiss (Anapahalis javanica) grow in the park. The world’s biggest flower, the Rafflessia arnoldi and the tallest flower, the Bunga bangkai raksasa (Amorphophallus titanum) are also find here. In the forests grow trees of the Shorea and Dipterocarpus family.
Fauna
About 180 species of birds and 200 species of mammals live in the park.

Mount Kerinci is the highest volcano in Indonesia and the highest Indonesian peak outside Papua (Irian Jaya). Much of the Kerinci Seblat National Park is located in the province of Jambi but the peak itself is in West Sumatra. Considering its height, Kerinci is not as difficult a climb as you might think and the views from the top are amazing. The closest airport is Padang from where it is a 6-8 hour road journey to the nearest accommodation to the Kerinci trail, at Kersik Tua (also spelt Tuo, 1,519m). Transport can be arranged at Padang airport or by contacting one of the homestays in advance. However, given the length of the journey it doesn’t come cheap so it isn’t recommended unless you have a group of 4 hikers minimum.

Although it is possible to get to the top and back in a very, very long day (minimum 12 hours hiking there and back), it is recommended that you spend a night on the mountain at Shelter 2 (3,040m) or even the more exposed Shelter 3 (3,306m). The summit is usually cloudy after mid-morning so if you want to admire the views it is best to plan on reaching the top for dawn the second day before making the descent back to Kersik Tua. The water sources are not reliable so make sure you take ample supplies.

You need to obtain a National Park permit, available from one of the homestays in Kersik Tua, which currently costs a reasonable Rp 20,000. It is also a good idea to take a photocopy of your passport with you. The best known homestay in the area is the one owned by Pak Subandi, one of many ethnically Javanese who live in the area. He is an expert on flora and fauna and many people stay here to explore the amazing animal and plant life including incredibly rare birds, pitcher plants, Armorphophallus titanium (the tallest flower in the world) and perhaps even elephants and tigers or even the mysterious Orang Pendek, a bipedal ape of Yeti-like reputation. There are plenty of guides available and Pak Subandi will provide you with some excellent meals of local produce both on and off the mountain. Make sure you discuss the cost in advance to avoid being surprised when the bill arrives.

The trail itself starts about 5km west of Kersik Tua, through the tea plantations past the very visible statue of a tiger. At the end of the road at 1,755m there is a dilapidated signpost beside fields of chillis and potatoes. The trail leads past a ranger post and up into the forest. After 30 minutes, Pos 1 (1,880m) is reached and after another 30 minutes you should have reached a rusty old sign (1,988m). There is a shelter at 2,207m and another rusty sign next to a large tree at 2,450m. Sections of the trail are steep muddy gullies which can be problematic when it rains but generally there are no technical difficulties.

At 3,040m there is a small path leading down to Shelter 2 on the left. This is the best camping area on the trail as it offers some protection from the wind and there is often a source of water down in the gully beside the camping area. There are metal frames here so extra tarpaulin would be excellent to keep you extra protected from getting soaked in the usual afternoon rains. It takes 3 hours to the summit from here which means a starting time of 3am if you want to see the sunrise from the top. Alternatively you can camp higher up beyond the treeline at Shelter 3 (3,306m) which will save you an hour in the morning. It is much more exposed but you will have great views of neighbouring Gunung Tujuh and the Gunung Tujuh Lake from your tent.

From the edge of the treeline, the trail is steep and there is plenty of shallow scree to negotiate. It is a good idea to wear gloves and make sure you have a torch you can attach to your head so you have both hands free. The tiny summit area appears quite suddenly and is marked with a cairn and orange flag which lies between two rocky outcrops. Down below steeply to the right is the smouldering crater and to the left is the Indian Ocean. Views are extensive – you should be able to see Gunung Tujuh on your right, Gunung Raya and Gunung Masurai to the south, and Gunung Talang, Gunung Marapi and Gunung Singgalang to the north.

After celebrating havng reached the top of Indonesia’s highest volcano, it is a long walk back down to Kersik Tua and Pak Subandi’s delicious potatoes.

Bagging information by Daniel Quinn

Mammals
* Lesser moonrat – Hylomys suillus
* Large flying fox – Pteropus vampyrus
* Long-tailed macaque – Macaca fascicularis
* Agile – Hylobates agilis
* Siamang – Symphalangus syndactylus
* Asiatic wild dog – Cuon alpinus
* Clouded leopard – Neofelis nebulosa
* Sumatran tiger – Panthera tigris sumatrae
* Flat-headed cat – Prionailurus planiceps
* Short-tailed mongoose – Herpestes brachyurus
* Collared mongoose – Herpestes semitorquatus
* Oriental small-clawed otter – Amblonyx cinereus
* Eurasian otter – Lutra lutra
* Hairy-nosed otter – Lutra sumatrana
* Smooth-coated otter – Lutrogale perspicillata
* Hog-badger – Arctonyx collaris
* Yellow-throated marten – Martes flavigula
* Indonesian mountain weasel – Mustela lutreolina
* Malayan weasel – Mustela nudipes
* Malayan sun bear – Helarctos malayanus
* Binturong – Arctictis binturong
* Small-toothed palm civet – Arctogalidia trivirgata
* Otter civet – Cynogale bennettii
* Banded palm civet – Hemigalus derbyanus
* Masked palm civet – Paguma larvata
* Common palm civet – Paradoxurus hermaphroditus
* Banded linsang – Prionodon linsang
* Malay civet – Viverra tangalunga
* Small Indian civet – Viverricula indica
* Asian elephant – Elephas maximus
* Sumatran rhinoceros – Dicerorhinus sumatrensis
* Malayan tapir – Tapirus indicus
* Sumatran serow – Naemorhedus sumatraensis
* Sumatran shrew-mouse – Mus crociduroides
* Rattus korinchi
* Kerinci rat – Sundamys infraluteus
* Sumatran rabbit – Nesolagus netscheri
Birds
* Blue-breasted Quail – Coturnix chinensis
* Red-billed Partridge – Arborophila rubrirostris
* Ferruginous Partridge – Caloperdix oculea
* Crested Patridge – Rollulus rouloul
* Red Junglefowl – Gallus gallus
* Salvadori’s Pheasant – Lophura inornata
* Bronze-tailed Peacock-Pheasant – Polyplectron chalcurum
* Great Argus – Argusianus argus
* Lesser Whistling-Duck – Dendrocygna javanica
* White-winged Duck – Cairina scutulata
* Pacific Black Duck – Anas superciliosa
* Barred Buttonquail – Turnix suscitator
* Speckled Piculet – Picumnus innominatus
* Rufous Piculet – Sasia abnormis
* Grey-capped Woodpecker – Dendrocopos canicapillus
* Rufous Woodpecker – Celeus brachyurus
* Banded Woodpecker – Picus mineaceus
* Lesser Yellownape – Picus chlorolophus
* Greater Yellownape – Picus flavinucha
* Checker-throated Woodpecker – Picus mentalis
* Grey-faced Woodpecker – Picus canus
* Olive-backed Woodpecker – Dinopium rafflesii
* Maroon Woodpecker – Blythipicus rubiginosus
* Orange-backed Woodpecker – Reinwardtipicus validus
* Buff-rumped Woodpecker – Meiglyptes tristis
* Buff-necked Woodpecker – Meiglyptes tukki
* Grey-and-buff Woodpecker – Hemicircus concretus
* Fire-tufted Barbet – Psilopogon pyrolophus
* Gold-whiskered Barbet – Megalaima chrysopogon
* Red-throated Barbet – Megalaima mystacophanos
* Black-browed Barbet – Megalaima oorti
* Yellow-crowned Barbet – Megalaima henricii
* Blue-eared Barbet – Megalaima australis
* Brown Barbet – Calorhamphus fuliginosus
* Oriental Pied-Hornbill – Anthracoceros albirostris
* Black Hornbill – Anthracoceros malayanus
* Rhinoceros Hornbill – Buceros rhinoceros
* Great Hornbill – Buceros bicornis
# Helmeted Hornbill – Buceros vigil
# Bushy-crested Hornbill – Anorrhinus galeritus
# White-crowned Hornbill – Aceros comatus
# Wrinkled Hornbill – Aceros corrugatus
# Wreathed Hornbill – Aceros undulatus
# Blue-tailed Trogon – Harpactes reinwardtii
# Diard’s Trogon – Harpactes diardii
# Scarlet-rumped Trogon – Harpactes duvaucelii
# Red-headed Trogon – Harpactes erythrocephalus
# Common Kingfisher – Alcedo atthis
# Blue-eared Kingfisher – Alcedo meninting
# Blue-banded Kingfisher – Alcedo euryzona
# Rufous-backed Kingfisher – Ceyx rufidorsa
# Banded Kingfisher – Lacedo pulchella
# Stork-billed Kingfisher – Pelargopsis capensis
# White-throated Kingfisher – Halcyon smyrnensis
# Black-capped Kingfisher – Halcyon pileata
# Collared Kingfisher – Todirhamphus chloris
# Rufous-collared Kingfisher – Actenoides concretus
# Red-bearded Bee-eater – Nyctyornis amictus
# Blue-throated Bee-eater – Merops viridis
# Chestnut-headed Bee-eater – Merops leschenaulti
# Hodgson’s Hawk-Cuckoo – Cuculus fugax
# Indian Cuckoo – Cuculus micropterus
# Oriental Cuckoo – Cuculus saturatus
# Banded Bay Cuckoo – Cacomantis sonneratii
# Plaintive Cuckoo – Cacomantis merulinus
# Rusty-breasted Cuckoo – Cacomantis sepulcralis
# Violet Cuckoo – Chrysococcyx xanthorhynchus
# Drongo Cuckoo – Surniculus lugubris
# Black-bellied Malkoha – Phaenicophaeus diardi
# Chestnut-bellied Malkoha – Phaenicophaeus sumatranus
# Green-billed Malkoha – Phaenicophaeus tristis
# Raffles’s Malkoha – Phaenicophaeus chlorophaeus
# Red-billed Malkoha – Phaenicophaeus javanicus
# Chestnut-breasted Malkoha – Phaenicophaeus curvirostris
# Short-toed Coucal – Centropus rectunguis
# Greater Coucal – Centropus sinensis
# Lesser Coucal – Centropus bengalensis
# Blue-crowned Hanging-Parrot – Loriculus galgulus
# Long-tailed Parakeet – Psittacula longicauda
# Waterfall Swift – Hydrochous gigas
# Glossy Swiftlet – Collocalia esculenta
# Black-nest Swiftlet – Collocalia maximus
# Edible-nest Swiftlet – Collocalia fuciphagus
# Silver-rumped Spinetail – Rhaphidura leucopygialis
# Silver-backed Needletail – Hirundapus cochinchinensis
# Brown-backed Needletail – Hirundapus giganteus
# Asian Palm-Swift – Cypsiurus balasiensis
# Fork-tailed Swift – Apus pacificus
# Grey-rumped Treeswift – Hemiprocne longipennis
# Whiskered Treeswift – Hemiprocne comata
# Barn Owl – Tyto alba
# Mountain Scops-Owl – Otus spilocephalus
# Rajah Scops-Owl – Otus brookii
# Barred Eagle-Owl – Bubo sumatranus
# Buffy Fish-Owl – Ketupa ketupu
# Spotted Wood-Owl – Strix seloputo
# Brown Wood-Owl – Strix leptogrammica
# Collared Owlet – Glaucidium brodiei
# Brown Hawk-Owl – Ninox scutulata
# Gould’s Frogmouth – Batrachostomus stellatus
# Short-tailed Frogmouth – Batrachostomus poliolophus
# Malaysian Eared-Nightjar – Eurostopodus temminckii
# Savanna Nightjar – Caprimulgus affinis
# Spotted Dove – Streptopelia chinensis
# Barred Cuckoo-Dove – Macropygia unchall
# Little Cuckoo-Dove – Macropygia ruficeps
# Emerald Dove – Chalcophaps indica
# Pink-necked Green-Pigeon – Treron vernans
# Thick-billed Green-Pigeon – Treron curvirostra
# Large Green-Pigeon – Treron capellei
# Sumatran Green-Pigeon – Treron oxyura
# Wedge-tailed Green-Pigeon – Treron sphenura
# Pink-headed Fruit-Dove – Ptilinopus porphyreus
# Jambu Fruit-Dove – Ptilinopus jambu
# Green Imperial-Pigeon – Ducula aenea
# Mountain Imperial-Pigeon – Ducula badia
# Masked Finfoot – Heliopais personata
# Slaty-breasted Rail – Gallirallus striatus
# White-breasted Waterhen – Amaurornis phoenicurus
# Ruddy-breasted Crake – Porzana fusca
# White-browed Crake – Porzana cinerea
# Purple Swamphen – Porphyrio porphyrio
# Common Moorhen – Gallinula chloropus
# Rufous Woodcock – Scolopax saturata
# Pintail Snipe – Gallinago stenura
# Marsh Sandpiper – Tringa stagnatilis
# Common Sandpiper – Tringa hypoleucos
# Greater Painted-snipe – Rostratula benghalensis
# Pheasant-tailed Jacana – Hydrophasianus chirurgus
# Pacific Golden-Plover – Pluvialis fulva
# Jerdon’s Baza – Aviceda jerdoni
# Oriental Honey-buzzard – Pernis ptilorhyncus
# Bat Hawk – Macheiramphus alcinus
# Black-winged Kite – Elanus caeruleus
# Brahminy Kite – Haliastur indus
# White-bellied Fish-Eagle – Haliaeetus leucogaster
# Crested Serpent-Eagle – Spilornis cheela
# Crested Goshawk – Accipiter trivirgatus
# Japanese Sparrowhawk – Accipiter gularis
# Besra – Accipiter virgatus
# Black Eagle – Ictinaetus malayensis
# Rufous-bellied Eagle – Hieraaetus kienerii
# Changeable Hawk-Eagle – Spizaetus cirrhatus
# Blyth’s Hawk-Eagle – Spizaetus alboniger
# Black-thighed Falconet – Microhierax fringillarius
# Yellow Bittern – Ixobrychus sinensis
# Schrenck’s Bittern – Ixobrychus eurhythmus
# Cinnamon Bittern – Ixobrychus cinnamomeus
# Little Egret – Egretta garzetta
# Purple Heron – Ardea purpurea
# Great Egret – Ardea alba
# Intermediate Egret – Ardea intermedia
# Cattle Egret – Bubulcus ibis
# Striated Heron – Butorides striatus
# Woolly-necked Stork – Ciconia episcopus
# Schneider’s Pitta – Pitta schneideri
# Giant Pitta – Pitta caerulea
# Black-crowned Pitta – Pitta venusta
# Dusky Broadbill – Corydon sumatranus
# Black-and-red Broadbill – Cymbirhynchus macrorhynchos
# Banded Broadbill – Eurylaimus javanicus
# Black-and-yellow Broadbill – Eurylaimus ochromalus
# Silver-breasted Broadbill – Serilophus lunatus
# Long-tailed Broadbill – Psarisomus dalhousiae
# Green Broadbill – Calyptomena viridis
# Asian Fairy-bluebird – Irena puella
# Greater Green Leafbird – Chloropsis sonnerati
# Lesser Green Leafbird – Chloropsis cyanopogon
# Blue-winged Leafbird – Chloropsis cochinchinensis
# Golden-fronted Leafbird – Chloropsis aurifrons
# Blue-masked Leafbird – Chloropsis venusta
# Tiger Shrike – Lanius tigrinus
# Brown Shrike – Lanius cristatus
# Long-tailed Shrike – Lanius schach
# Malaysian Rail-babbler – Eupetes macrocerus
# Crested Jay – Platylophus galericulatus
# Black Magpie – Platysmurus leucopterus
# Green Magpie – Cissa chinensis
# Sumatran Treepie – Dendrocitta occipitalis
# Slender-billed Crow – Corvus enca
# Large-billed Crow – Corvus macrorhynchos
# White-breasted Woodswallow – Artamus leucorynchus
# Dark-throated Oriole – Oriolus xanthonotus
# Black-and-crimson Oriole – Oriolus cruentus
# Sunda Cuckooshrike – Coracina larvata
# Lesser Cuckooshrike – Coracina fimbriata
# Fiery Minivet – Pericrocotus igneus
# Grey-chinned Minivet – Pericrocotus solaris
# Sunda Minivet – Pericrocotus miniatus
# Scarlet Minivet – Pericrocotus flammeus
# Bar-winged Flycatcher-shrike – Hemipus picatus
# Black-winged Flycatcher-shrike – Hemipus hirundinaceus
# White-throated Fantail – Rhipidura albicollis
# Spotted Fantail – Rhipidura perlata
# Black Drongo – Dicrurus macrocercus
# Ashy Drongo – Dicrurus leucophaeus
# Bronzed Drongo – Dicrurus aeneus
# Scaly Thrush – Zoothera dauma
# Island Thrush – Turdus poliocephalus
# Eyebrowed Thrush – Turdus obscurus
# Lesser Shortwing – Brachypteryx leucophrys
# White-browed Shortwing – Brachypteryx montana
# Grey-chested Jungle-Flycatcher – Rhinomyias umbratilis
# Asian Brown Flycatcher – Muscicapa dauurica
# Mugimaki Flycatcher – Ficedula mugimaki
# Snowy-browed Flycatcher – Ficedula hyperythra
# Rufous-chested Flycatcher – Ficedula dumetoria
# Little Pied Flycatcher – Ficedula westermanni
# Verditer Flycatcher – Eumyias thalassina
# Indigo Flycatcher – Eumyias indigo
# Large Niltava – Niltava grandis
# Rufous-vented Niltava – Niltava sumatrana
# White-tailed Flycatcher – Cyornis concretus
# Large-billed Blue-Flycatcher – Cyornis caerulatus
# Mangrove Blue-Flycatcher – Cyornis rufigastra
# Pygmy Blue-Flycatcher – Muscicapella hodgsoni
# Grey-headed Canary-Flycatcher – Culicicapa ceylonensis
# Oriental Magpie-Robin – Copsychus saularis
# White-rumped Shama – Copsychus malabaricus
# Rufous-tailed Shama – Trichixos pyrropyga
# Sunda Robin – Cinclidium diana
# Sunda Forktail – Enicurus velatus
# Chestnut-naped Forktail – Enicurus ruficapillus
# White-crowned Forktail – Enicurus leschenaulti
# Sumatran Cochoa – Cochoa beccarii
# Common Myna – Acridotheres tristis
# Hill Myna – Gracula religiosa
# Velvet-fronted Nuthatch – Sitta frontalis
# Blue Nuthatch – Sitta azurea
# Great Tit – Parus major
# Barn Swallow – Hirundo rustica
# Pacific Swallow – Hirundo tahitica
# Asian House-Martin – Delichon dasypus
# Cream-striped Bulbul – Pycnonotus leucogrammicus
# Spot-necked Bulbul – Pycnonotus tympanistrigus
# Black-and-white Bulbul – Pycnonotus melanoleucos
# Black-headed Bulbul – Pycnonotus atriceps
# Black-crested Bulbul – Pycnonotus melanicterus
# Scaly-breasted Bulbul – Pycnonotus squamatus
# Grey-bellied Bulbul – Pycnonotus cyaniventris
# Sooty-headed Bulbul – Pycnonotus aurigaster
# Puff-backed Bulbul – Pycnonotus eutilotus
# Orange-spotted Bulbul – Pycnonotus bimaculatus
# Yellow-vented Bulbul – Pycnonotus goiavier
# Olive-winged Bulbul – Pycnonotus plumosus
# Cream-vented Bulbul – Pycnonotus simplex
# Red-eyed Bulbul – Pycnonotus brunneus
# Spectacled Bulbul – Pycnonotus erythropthalmos
# Ochraceous Bulbul – Alophoixus ochraceus
# Grey-cheeked Bulbul – Alophoixus bres
# Yellow-bellied Bulbul – Alophoixus phaeocephalus
# Lesser Racket-tailed Drongo – Dicrurus remifer
# Sumatran Drongo – Dicrurus sumatranus
# Greater Racket-tailed Drongo – Dicrurus paradiseus
# Black-naped Monarch – Hypothymis azurea
# Asian Paradise-Flycatcher – Terpsiphone paradisi
# Common Iora – Aegithina tiphia
# Green Iora – Aegithina viridissima
# Rufous-winged Philentoma – Philentoma pyrhopterum
# Maroon-breasted Philentoma – Philentoma velatum
# Large Woodshrike – Tephrodornis gularis
# Shiny Whistling-Thrush – Myophonus melanurus
# Sunda Whistling-Thrush – Myophonus glaucinus
# Chestnut-capped Thrush – Zoothera interpres
# Siberian Thrush – Zoothera sibirica
# Sunda Thrush – Zoothera andromedae
# Hairy-backed Bulbul – Tricholestes criniger
# Buff-vented Bulbul – Iole olivacea
# Streaked Bulbul – Ixos malaccensis
# Ashy Bulbul – Hemixos flavala
# Sunda Bulbul – Hypsipetes virescens
# Zitting Cisticola – Cisticola juncidis
# Hill Prinia – Prinia atrogularis
# Bar-winged Prinia – Prinia familiaris
# Yellow-bellied Prinia – Prinia flaviventris
# Oriental White-eye – Zosterops palpebrosus
# Black-capped White-eye – Zosterops atricapillus
# Mountain White-eye – Zosterops montanus
# Sunda Bush-Warbler – Cettia vulcania
# Oriental Reed-Warbler – Acrocephalus orientalis
# Mountain Tailorbird – Orthotomus cuculatus
# Dark-necked Tailorbird – Orthotomus atrogularis
# Rufous-tailed Tailorbird – Orthotomus sericeus
# Ashy Tailorbird – Orthotomus ruficeps
# Inornate Warbler – Phylloscopus inornatus
# Arctic Warbler – Phylloscopus borealis
# Eastern Crowned-Warbler – Phylloscopus coronatus
# Mountain Leaf-Warbler – Phylloscopus trivirgatus
# Chestnut-crowned Warbler – Seicercus castaniceps
# Sunda Warbler – Seicercus grammiceps
# Sunda Laughingthrush – Garrulax palliatus
# White-crested Laughingthrush – Garrulax leucolophus
# Black Laughingthrush – Garrulax lugubris
# Chestnut-capped Laughingthrush – Garrulax mitratus
# Ferruginous Babbler – Trichastoma bicolor
# Abbott’s Babbler – Malacocincla abbotti
# Horsfield’s Babbler – Malacocincla sepiarium
# Short-tailed Babbler – Malacocincla malaccensis
# Black-capped Babbler – Pellorneum capistratum
# Moustached Babbler – Malacopteron magnirostre
* Sooty-capped Babbler – Malacopteron affine
* Scaly-crowned Babbler – Malacopteron cinereum
* Chestnut-backed Scimitar-Babbler – Pomatorhinus montanus
* Long-billed Wren-Babbler – Rimator malacoptilus
* Rusty-breasted Wren-Babbler – Napothera rufipectus
* Marbled Wren-Babbler – Napothera marmorata
* Eyebrowed Wren-Babbler – Napothera epilepidota
* Pygmy Wren-Babbler – Pnoepyga pusilla
* Rufous-fronted Babbler – Stachyris rufifrons
* Golden Babbler – Stachyris chrysaea
* Grey-throated Babbler – Stachyris nigriceps
* Grey-headed Babbler – Stachyris poliocephala
* Spot-necked Babbler – Stachyris striolata
* White-necked Babbler – Stachyris leucotis
* Chestnut-rumped Babbler – Stachyris maculata
* Chestnut-winged Babbler – Stachyris erythroptera
* Striped Tit-Babbler – Macronous gularis
* Fluffy-backed Tit-Babbler – Macronous ptilosus
* Silver-eared Mesia – Leiothrix argentauris
* White-browed Shrike-Babbler – Pteruthius flaviscapis
* Brown Fulvetta – Alcippe brunneicauda
* Long-tailed Sibia – Heterophasia picaoides
* Yellow-breasted Flowerpecker – Prionochilus maculatus
* Crimson-breasted Flowerpecker – Prionochilus percussus
* Yellow-vented Flowerpecker – Dicaeum chrysorrheum
* Orange-bellied Flowerpecker – Dicaeum trigonostigma
* Plain Flowerpecker – Dicaeum concolor
* Fire-breasted Flowerpecker – Dicaeum ignipectus
* Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker – Dicaeum cruentatum
* Plain Sunbird – Anthreptes simplex
* Plain-throated Sunbird – Anthreptes malacensis
* Red-throated Sunbird – Anthreptes rhodolaema
* Ruby-cheeked Sunbird – Anthreptes singalensis
* Purple-naped Sunbird – Hypogramma hypogrammicum
* Purple-throated Sunbird – Nectarinia sperata
* Olive-backed Sunbird – Nectarinia jugularis
* Crimson Sunbird – Aethopyga siparaja
* Temminck’s Sunbird – Aethopyga temminckii
* Little Spiderhunter – Arachnothera longirostra
* Thick-billed Spiderhunter – Arachnothera crassirostris
* Long-billed Spiderhunter – Arachnothera robusta
* Spectacled Spiderhunter – Arachnothera flavigaster
* Yellow-eared Spiderhunter – Arachnothera chrysogenys
* Grey-breasted Spiderhunter – Arachnothera affinis
* Eurasian Tree Sparrow – Passer montanus
* Forest Wagtail – Dendronanthus indicus
* Yellow Wagtail – Motacilla flava
* Grey Wagtail – Motacilla cinerea
* Paddyfield Pipit – Anthus rufulus
* Baya Weaver – Ploceus philippinus
* Pin-tailed Parrotfinch – Erythrura prasina
* White-rumped Munia – Lonchura striata
* Scaly-breasted Munia – Lonchura punctulata
* White-headed Munia – Lonchura majaReptiles
* Asian Brown Tortoise – Manouria emys
* Gonocephalus klossi
* Water Monitor – Varanus salvator
* Green Whip Snake – Ahaetulla prasina
* Reticulated Python – Python reticulatus
Country: Indonesia
Subregion Name: Sumatra (Indonesia)
Volcano Number: 0601-17=
Volcano Type: Stratovolcano
Volcano Status: Historical
Last Known Eruption: 2009 
Summit Elevation: 3800 m 12,467 feet
Latitude: 1.697°S 1°41’50″S
Longitude: 101.264°E 101°15’52″E
The 3800-m-high Gunung Kerinci in central Sumatra forms Indonesia’s highest volcano and is one of the most active in Sumatra. Kerinci is capped by an unvegetated young summit cone that was constructed NE of an older crater remnant. The volcano contains a deep 600-m-wide summit crater often partially filled by a small crater lake that lies on the NE crater floor, opposite the SW-rim summit of Kerinci. The massive 13 x 25 km wide volcano towers 2400-3300 m above surrounding plains and is elongated in a N-S direction. The frequently active Gunung Kerinci has been the source of numerous moderate explosive eruptions since its first recorded eruption in 1838.

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